credit repair tools


5 More ways to jump start your credit score (Part 2)

When a home buyer comes to a mortgage broker and applies for a loan, the difference between a 720, 680, or 620 FICO will make a huge difference in which loan programs they get approved for and the interest rate. Furthermore, consumers will be able to afford more home when buying, save a lot when refinancing, and generally have better options.

In part one of this blog, we covered 5 ways consumers  can jump-start a borrower’s credit score.

Mortgage brokers understand that improving a borrower’s credit score is one of the most important things that will benefit their clients. But they haven’t really had to worry about credit scores in recent years, as the housing market has seen historically-low interest rates, widely accessible to most homebuyers and homeowners even if they didn’t have the highest scores.

However, times are ‘a changing, and with interest rate hikes and storm clouds on the economic horizon, it’s not unrealistic to think that we may see a market – and financial – tightening within a couple of years. While loan officers and mortgage brokers have their fingers on the pulse of these changes as they occur, there is one thing that will return to relevancy: credit score.

But you don’t want to wait six months to a year to organically improve their credit score (nor will they wait around!). Luckily, we have some tactics and strategies that can help improve a consumer’s credit score in short order. In this blog, we’ll bring you the first five strategies, and look for the next five in our upcoming blog.

And you can always contact Nationwide Credit Clearing for more information on how to improve your credit score (or your client’s score) quickly

  1. Pay for deletion of collections

Many of us have collections on our credit reports, which can do some serious and ongoing damage to your score. But, there may be a way to get it removed. If you’ve missed enough payments to have an account in collections, your creditors may agree to erase any negative credit reporting for that account if you pay it off.

The good news is that you can also negotiate your payoff, and if it’s in collections, they may accept less than the full amount to settle you up – sometimes even 50 percent of your balance or far less!

Once you negotiate the payoff amount AND they agree to remove the item from your credit report, only pay the collection via a mailed certified check, with “Cash only if you delete account from credit report” written above the endorsement line. Also, make sure you get their promise in writing via a letter of deletion. We can use the letter to apply for a rapid rescore instead for you, so you won’t have to wait a month or more to see your credit score rise!

  1. Add accounts that aren’t showing up

A surefire way to increase credit is to add positive accounts that aren’t currently being reported. Although FICO doesn’t actively publicize this information, you can do that by requesting unreported accounts be reflected on your credit. Of course, only add accounts that were in good standing, but this can add well-seasoned positive credit lines that boost your score.

Think about any company that pulls your credit and you pay the bill on time. For instance, cell phones, Internet providers, utility companies, and medical billers often don’t bother reporting credit (because it’s not mandatory) and even landlords can report rent payments. If you ask them to do so, they very well might comply – posting a well-seasoned, positive new trade line on your credit score.

  1. Remove federal liens

New rules have been phased in by the credit bureaus that make federal liens like tax liens, judgments, etc. less harmful to a borrower’s credit score. Due to that change, millions of Americans may see an increase to their scores without doing anything. It also may make it easier to remove harmful liens from credit scoring consideration, depending on the type and circumstances.

For instance, the IRS has a program that allows them to withdrawal the lien and deletes it from the consumer’s credit report if it’s paid. Even better, the IRS will now remove their lien from your credit report even if you still owe a balance under $25,000, as long as the taxpayer is making monthly payments as promised.

For any federal lien removal with the IRS, just call them to get the forms you need to apply for a lien withdrawal request. However, it does usually take the IRS 60 days to process lien withdrawals, at which time you’ll be issued a lien-withdrawal letter that you can get to the credit bureaus or use for a rapid rescore.

  1. Become an authorized user on someone else’s credit card

We talked in part one of this blog about removing authorized-user accounts that are hurting their score. However, you can also flip that. One of the most efficient ways to increase your credit score in short order is by becoming an authorized user on someone else’s credit card. Once you’re authorized, the new positive trade line will show up on your credit within 30 days as if you’ve had it for the duration.

It’s important you do this correctly – it has to be a credit line in great standing and make sure you offer your social security number, so they report it to the credit bureaus correctly. Additionally, it should be someone you trust well (and they trust you!) because if the primary user runs up big debt, has late payments, or defaults, you’ll be on the hook, and your credit will actually be damaged. But FICO knows a lot of parents do this to build their teen or college-aged children’s credit – and it’s a perfectly legal practice, so check to see if the lender has specific requirements or rules for added tradelines.

  1. Rapid Rescore

A Rapid Rescore is a process that lenders can use that quickly re-calculates a borrower’s credit score after they’ve don’t something to improve it, like pay off a credit card, dispute an incorrect late payment, or the like. Instead of waiting for the correction to appear on the credit score naturally – which will take much longer – a Rapid Rescore is a convenient service that will process that updated score in short order.

A Rapid Rescore fills a need or solves a problem any time you need your score to be accurately updated ASAP. For instance, timing is everything if you’re under contract for a home purchase but can’t go forward with the deal if your mortgage loan isn’t approved due to a subpar credit score. At that point, paying off debt or doing something to improve your credit and then doing a rapid rescore can save the deal.

Bonus tip:

Are you really serious about improving your credit score before buying a home or taking out a loan, and therefore saving yourself a whole lot of money? Mortgage brokers – do your clients desperately need a credit score boost in a short window in order to qualify or access the best rates?

***

If you have more questions about improving credit scores quickly, contact Nationwide Credit Clearing for a free credit report and consultation!


Millions of Americans get a credit score boost because of new scoring rules. Will your score go up?

While millions of Americans just filed their taxes in hopes of a big refund, consumers may be getting some good financial news in another arena: their credit scores. That’s because the three major credit reporting bureaus – Experian, Equifax, and Transunion, just reported that they’ll start excluding tax liens from their credit scoring algorithms.

In a concerted effort to improve the accuracy and fairness of their scoring models in respect to public records, a significant number of Americans will see their credit scores jump, virtually overnight (the changes took place April 16.)

The push for reformatting the way judgments and tax liens are factored into credit scoring comes after a study from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau revealed that incorrect, outdated, or otherwise erroneous information too-often showed up in credit files, sinking that person’s score. So, starting last July, the credit bureaus started their clean sweep of civil judgment data from credit reports, including some tax lien reporting. This April 16, they finished that job.

To be clear, the vast majority of Americans won’t see any difference if they check their credit score again. According to the IRS and other reports, between 93% and 94% of Americans do not have any sort of tax liens reporting on their credit. However, that still leaves about 12 to 14 million Americans that may have tax liens or other judgments affecting their credit score.

The number of people who see a credit score benefit could be even higher. Based on research by LexisNexis Risk Solutions, about 11% of our population will have a judgment or tax lien removed from their credit file.

No matter how you add it up, since the credit bureaus are reshuffling their credit scoring model and excluding tax liens from consideration, these “lucky” millions of consumers will enjoy that sizable score increase.

So, just how high might their scores increase with the new scoring changes?

The answer is “It depends,” of course, because credit scoring is based on a host of factors and individual circumstances (like payment history, status of other existing loans, how seasoned accounts are, and credit mix). While many consumers may see their FICO score up by about 10 points after the April 16 change, a whole lot more could see their score ascend even higher.

For instance, according to a study of 30 million credit files by credit scorer FICO:

• The majority of consumers will see an increase of about 1 to 19 points.
• But between 1 and 2 million consumers may see their scores skyrocket by 20 to 39 points.
• In the case of about 300,000 consumers, their credit scores could go up by as much as 60 points when multiple liens are removed – or more.

But, it’s important to remember that the vast majority of people won’t see any credit score increase at all, as they don’t have tax liens or judgments. Others point to the fact that the 92-93% of consumers who don’t have a tax lien are somehow unduly being penalized because they won’t see their score go up.

Likewise, various financial watchdog groups have gone on record that the changes won’t make a big impact for consumers, at all. According to Eric Ellman, senior vice president of the Consumer Data Industry Association, “Analyses conducted by the credit reporting agencies and credit score developers FICO and VantageScore show only modest credit scoring impacts.”

But wait, is it possible that the credit scoring changes not only make a minimal impact but even harm consumers? “Lenders and servicers have to hedge for that risk,” says Nick Larson, business development manager for aforementioned LexisNexis Risk Solutions. “Overall, consumers actually get hurt,” he goes on, pointing to the fact that banks, lenders, and creditors will have to adjust their guidelines and regulations accordingly (therefore hurting those who didn’t see a credit score increase from erasing tax liens) just to provide the status quo risk-gauging model.

No matter what the temporary impact may be, remember that the best way to maintain a great credit score over the long term – and save thousands on your credit cards, mortgages, loans, and more – is to make your payments on time, keep your balances low, and keep a good mix of seasoned, responsible accounts.

For more help or if you’d like a great credit score increase of your own, contact Nationwide Credit Clearing for a free report and consultation.


The 15 most common credit score wrecking balls!

1. Paying late (or not at all)

Of course, one of the biggest wrecking balls that smash through your credit score and finances is paying your bills late. For accounts on your credit report, like mortgages, credit cards, auto and student loans, and many others, paying even just a day or two late can trigger a 30-day late, which will significantly ding your score.

Even worse, being 90 days late causes further damage to your credit report that. Remember that payment history (paying on time every month) is 30% of your score, so pay on time to dodge this wrecking ball!

2. Max out credit cards or accounts

Your credit ratio, or the amount of total debt you hold compared to your available credit, is also a major factor for your score, making up 30% of your FICO as well

So, when you max out your credit cards, even if they are paid on time, your score will get smashed.

3. Have an account charged off and go to collections

Once you are 90 days late with your credit card payment or bill, the next step is typically that your creditor soon charges off the debt, sending it to a third party for collections, causing even more damage to your credit score that can be hard to erase.

4. Cosign for someone who doesn’t pay

Maybe you have a friend or even family member that asks you to be a cosigner on their credit card, auto loan, or another account. I know that you’d like to help, but aware that if they don’t pay, YOU are fully responsible for their debt. In fact, those late payments will show up on your credit report just like you took out the debt, yourself.

5. Filing bankruptcy

If you want to talk about a big, heavy wrecking ball, filing a Chapter 7 or 13 Bankruptcy is one of the most damaging events to someone’s credit score. However, for some people, legal insolvency is still the best option if they are drowning in debt with no way out. The good news is that Nationwide Credit Clearing can work with you during and after the BK process to repair the damage!

6. Foreclosing on your home

Another major wrecking ball is foreclosure, which occurs when you miss enough house payments so the bank legally repossesses the home. Foreclosures cause serious damage to your credit score and will take seven years to fall off your credit report.

7. A judgment against you 

This is a dangerous and scary wrecking ball for consumers. When you don’t pay your debt obligations, your lender or third-party collection agencies may take you to court, trying to secure a judgment for the amount you owe (plus late fees, penalties, and court costs). Also, there are state and federal judgments for unpaid child support, alimony, IRS tax liens, etc. that will never disappear from your credit file until they’re satisfied! Contact us immediately if you have judgments!

8. Applying for new credit recklessly

If you start filling out a lot of credit card and loan applications within a short period, it shows the credit bureaus that you’re financially desperate, or something is wrong. Since their main job is indicating risk for lenders, your credit score will take a hit, accordingly.

9. Close old credit cards in good standing

It may seem like good financial sense to cancel old or unused credit cards, but by shutting down a seasoned card or credit line in good standing, you’ve just effectively erased a positive track record of paying on time. Sorry, but your score will go down once that positive payment history is taken out of the equation.

10. Not pay student loans

Remember when we were talking about judgments? Unpaid federal student loans will level your credit very quickly, and they also won’t naturally disappear from your credit report until they’re paid. Unfortunately, unpaid student loans are the fastest growing form of credit score “wrecking ball” in the United States.

11. Utilize payday loans, cash advances, or financing through Rent-a-Centers

All credit is not created equal, and when you take out loans that are deemed risky, it will hurt your score. Payday lenders, check cashing services, certain retail credit cards, and financing purchases like furniture can shake the foundation of your score.

12. Try to outthink the credit card companies with balance transfers

Are you “jumping around” between credit card offers, taking out 0% interest or cash-back offers and moving balances around just to stay one step ahead? The chances are that questionable financial practice will catch up with you sometime, in the form of penalties, late fees, small print you miss, or higher interest rates. But even if it works, your credit score will be battered and bruised.

13. Not using your credit at all

About 30 million Americans are considered “Credit Invisible,” as they don’t have a sufficient – or any – credit history. If you don’t have any credit cards or other accounts, there’s no established payment history for the credit bureaus to judge you by, and your score will be rock-bottom. Luckily, you can contact Nationwide Credit Clearing, and we will guide you through how to establish credit and build a good score.

14. An imbalanced mix of credit

Do you have only credit cards on your credit report? Or, is have you taken out four installment loans but nothing else? An imbalance between credit cards, installment debt, auto or student loans, mortgages, etc. can also act like a demolition crew to your credit score.

15. Not checking your credit frequently

These days, credit and identity theft is the fastest growing form of crime around the world, and companies that collect your sensitive financial data – and even credit bureaus (like Equifax) are susceptible to hackers. Even if you pay all of your bills on time and do everything else correctly, the best way to protect your credit and finances is to regularly monitor your credit report.

Start by contacting Nationwide Credit Clearing for a free credit report and consultation at (773) 862-7700 or MyNationwideCredit.com.


5 Ways to jump-start your credit score.

Is your credit score far less than ideal these days? If your FICO is lagging, just like about 30 percent of all Americans, it may be holding you back from getting a better credit card, applying for a mortgage loan to buy a house or even being hired for your dream job.

But the good news is that there are strategies you can use to build your credit, raising it to the point that you are considered a prime candidate for the best interest rates and credit approvals from banks, lenders, and other financial institutions.

Some of these strategies are part of a long-term plan to maintain good credit, but we also have ways to almost instantly boost your score.

If you are planning to apply for a home mortgage, finance a new car, or try to get a job that checks credit as part of the hiring process (like about 45 percent of all employers these days), you’ll want to utilize these five tactics.

Remember that Nationwide Credit Clearing is the U.S. leader in fast, effective, and affordable credit repair, so call us if you’d like a free credit report and consultation to get started!

  1. Pay down balances.

We know that the ratio of your debt to total available credit – called credit utilization ratio – makes up about 30 percent of your credit score. Therefore, people with maxed out credit cards or high debt loads compared to their available credit will see their scores steadily sinking.

So, the first thing you want to do when improving your credit score is to pay down as much debt as possible.

It’s important to get your credit utilization ratio below 30 percent (so you only owe $3,000 or less on a credit card with a $10,000 available balance). Credit experts even suggest keeping a utilization ratio of 10% or less to achieve a great credit score. However, don’t go all the way to 0% because it won’t show an established payment history they can use in their calculations (since you won’t have any payment).

  1. Request a credit line increase.

Don’t have enough money sitting around to pay down your credit balances enough to raise your scores? Another sneaky-good way to improve your credit utilization ratio – without paying down one cent of debt – is to increase your total available credit. For instance, let’s say you had a $10,000 credit line but owed $4,000 (so your utilization ratio was 40 percent).

Instead of paying down your debt, if you could get the credit card company to increase your available limit to $15,000 from 10k, your utilization ratio just went down to about 27 percent – and your score would go up! To do this, simply call the credit card company or lender and make your case over the phone and they’ll either approve or deny your request or approve a lesser increase.

  1. Ask your creditors to remove late payments from your credit report

Did you know that you can simply ask your creditors to remove evidence of late payments from your credit report? Why not? It’s free for you to ask (nicely), and the worst thing they can say is “no.” Called ‘Goodwill late-payment removal,’ this practice is more common than you may think. In fact, any creditor has the power to remove a late payment from your credit report.

For instance, department store credit accounts and other retail accounts are usually pretty liberal with goodwill late-payment removals. They may do just that if you can make a good case that it was a one-time incident because you didn’t receive the bill on time, an address change, etc. and that you otherwise have a perfect record with them.

Once they tell you that the late payment is removed, ask for payment history update letter, which is your confirmation in case you need to present documentation to the credit bureaus.

  1. Pay for deletion of collections

Many of us have collections on our credit reports, which can do some serious and ongoing damage to your score But there may be a way to get it removed. If you’ve missed enough payments to have an account in collections, your creditors may agree to erase any negative credit reporting for that account if you pay it off.

The good news is that you can also negotiate your payoff, and if it’s in collections, they may accept less than the full amount to settle you up – sometimes even 50 percent of your balance or far less!

Once you negotiate the payoff amount AND they agree to remove the item from your credit report, only pay the collection via a mailed certified check, with “Cash only if you delete account from credit report” written above the endorsement line. Also, make sure you get their promise in writing via a letter of deletion. We can use the letter to apply for a rapid rescore instead for you, so you won’t have to wait a month or more to see your credit score rise!

  1. Dispute any errors on your credit report.

Most people don’t realize that credit reports often contain mistakes, misreporting, duplicate items, or outdated information. All of these things may be lowering your score, but they can also be removed. Start by contacting Nationwide Credit Clearing for a copy of your credit report, and we’ll help you review it carefully for any errors or inaccuracies.

By reviewing it line-by-line, we’ll be able to highlight inaccuracies or items that are lowering your score. Remember that there are three major credit bureaus and they each may report different information, so it might be a good idea to check all three. Look for errors on larger accounts first, length of history, payments reporting on time, and that your balances are accurate.

The last step is formally disputing each inaccuracy or error with each of the credit bureaus, Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion, separately. They are legally obligated to get back to you in a certain amount of time with proof that the information you’re disputing is correct – or they have to change it or remove it.

***

If you have more questions about disputing items, how to boost your score quickly, or want a free copy of your credit report, contact Nationwide Credit Clearing!

 

 

 

.

 


50 things you didn’t know about credit scores, credit reporting, and debt. (Part 1)

1. The first credit card ever was released in 1951 and issued by the American Express company.

2. People often talk about their “credit score” as if they had just one. In fact, there are more than 100 credit scoring models used by banks, lenders, and financial institutions.

3. But FICO is the biggest and most recognizable credit scoring model. FICO is an acronym for the “Fair Isaac Corporation” and is based on the risk-predicting algorithms developed by mathematician Earl Isaac and engineer Bill Fair in 1956, and then rolled out in the 1980s as a credit scoring system.

4. Did you know that these days, credit scores are even influencing people’s dating decisions? It’s true, as surveys show that the majority of people would consider someone’s credit score before dating them or getting in a relationship. There’s even an online dating site called CreditScoreDating.com with the motto, “Credit Scores are Sexy!”

5. Millennials – and especially college kids – are really missing the boat when it comes to keeping good credit scores. In fact, Millennials have the lowest Vantage credit scores of any generation, including Gen X (ages 30-46), Baby Boomers (47-65), and the Greatest Generation (66+).

6. Speaking to that point, surveys show that 85% of U.S. college students don’t even know their own credit score!

7. These days, your credit score impacts far more than just buying a house or getting a good rate on your credit card, as many employers now check the credit reports of their potential applicants. In fact, 1 in 4 Americans looking for a job have been subjected to a credit check, and 1 in 10 has been disqualified from getting hired because of something on their credit report!

8. According to reports by the Department of Labor, occupations that routinely check a job applicant’a credit include: 1) parking booth operator, 2) the military, 3) accounting, 4) mortgage loan originator, 5) Transportation Security Administrator (TSA), 6) law enforcement and 7) temporary service positions and many more.

9. FICO scores are based on a complex (and secretive_ algorithm that factors every nuance of credit behavior from tens of millions of consumers. Their programs then look for patterns that will help them predict future defaults (or on-time payments) for borrowers, which they then translate as a numeric spectrum of risk for lenders, or your credit score.

10. These days, an estimated 33% (one out of every three) of all American adults do not pay their bills on time every month!

11. How much bad credit card debt do the big banks take a loss on every year? Last year, the top 100 banks in the U.S. had an average charge-off rate of 3.87%, which means that nearly 4 out of every 100 people don’t pay,

12. Last year, the average Annual Percentage Rate (APR) for all U.S. credit cards was 13.14% – another great reason to build up your credit score and get out of debt this year!

13. About 19 countries around the world use some form of FICO scores, and many more have their own credit scoring system.

14. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. adults – or 144 million people – haven’t even looked at their credit report within the last 365 days.

15. And one-third of working-age Americans don’t even have a clue what their credit score is!

16. Visa is by far the biggest credit card in the U.S., with 278 million cards at home (that’s about one for every adult in our population!). Mastercard is next with 180 million cards

But while Visa has 522 million cards across the globe, MasterCard just beats them out with 551 million cards abroad.

17. Visa is also the largest credit card in the U.S. by sales volume, with $981 billion in annual charges. MasterCard is second with about $534 billion in yearly debt from cardmembers.

18. The average U.S. consumer has 13 credit accounts listed on their credit report, which includes 9 credit cards and 4 installment loans. (But remember, that doesn’t mean they’re all open and active, just reporting.)

19. In the 1990s, America saw an explosion of personal debt levels that was unprecedented. One of the main causes was the fact that banks, lenders, and financial institutions starting using credit scores en masse to help them gauge risk and make faster, more accurate decisions.

20. In fact, in 1995, the nation’s two largest mortgage financing agencies, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, started advising lenders to use FICO scores for their borrowers, allowing the floodgates on lending to tens of millions of Americans.

21. But at first, FICO didn’t want to reveal how they calculated a consumers credit score, opting to keep it a secret. But under intense pressure from financial advocates and governmental influence, in 2003 they released a list of 22 factors that go into their credit scoring model. That same year, the U.S. Congress passed a new law that granted consumers the right to access their credit score.

22. Remember that credit scoring systems weren’t designed to help consumers and the general public, but lenders and companies. Therefore, credit scoring models, reports, and computations weren’t supposed to be easy for the average person to understand!

23. Insurance companies are using credit scores and reporting like never before. In fact, insurance actuarials prove that the lower a customer’s credit score, the more likely they are to file an insurance claim – costing their insurer money.

24. These days, 90% of homeowners and auto insurance companies use credit score as a factor when assigning and rating premiums! Therefore, insurance companies reward customers with good credit scores, and your premiums will be much lower than for those with a low credit score.

25. If you want to improve your credit score (and keep it high), then try to only keep credit cards from well-respected, major banks, like VISA, Mastercard, American Express, etc.). They’ll show that you’re a better steward of your finances and a more responsible debt holder than if you open accounts with lesser known finance companies, retail cards, etc., and your credit score will reflect that.

***

Look for part 2 of this blog, with 25 more things you didn’t know about credit scores, credit reporting, and debt!


Can you achieve a perfect credit score? We’ll show you how!

When you get together with your friends, family, and coworkers, there’s always one person who loves to brag about how well they’re doing. It may be about their new car, high-paying job, or even the amazingly low interest rate they just got on their mortgage.

So wouldn’t it be great if the next time they opened their mouth to be braggadocious, you could one-up them by reporting that you had a perfect credit score? There’s no topping that!

But there are plenty of financial benefits to a perfect (or excellent) credit score, too.

FICO, the most popular credit scoring model, issued by the Fair Isaac Corporation, ranges from 300 all the way up to 850. Generally, a score above 680 or so is considered “good,” and once you hit the 720 to 740 range, your score is considered “excellent.”

But there’s another level or two above that for consumers to strive for. In fact, 32.8 million people have FICO scores between 700 and 749, but approximately 70 million consumers have FICOs above 760.

Don’t stop there, because it’s possible to raise your credit score even higher. An estimated 36.4 million people have scores between 750 and 799, and 38.6 million are in the 800+ FICO range.

Only about 1% of consumers, around 2 million people, ever reach high-end 800-850 scores.

In fact, FICO estimates that only about .5% (half of one percent) of all consumers with a credit score have a perfect 850 FICO. To put in in context, the average FICO score in the United States has just reached 700 for the first time.

Remember that FICO isn’t the only credit scoring model, as there are dozens of other scoring models that banks and lenders use to make lending decisions, and then different versions of each depending on what kind of loan or even consumer they’re vetting.

So let’s say you reach an 800 credit score, or even an enviable 850 – a perfect credit score. Beyond bragging to your friends, what are the benefits?

An 850 credit score may not help as much as you think IF you compare that to another great score, like an 800, 780, or even lower. That’s because FICO uses algorithms that rate scores within “brackets,” which means that if you have above 750 or maybe 780, there really won’t be an additional benefit the higher you go.

“It’s important to understand,” reports FICO spokesman Anthony Sprauve, “that if you have a FICO score above 760, you’re going to be getting the best rates and opportunities.”

For instance, a consumer with an 850 FICO will most likely be offered the same mortgage interest rate, auto loan rate, or 0% interest credit card offer as another consumer that “only” has a 780 score.

While you may expect little perks, additional beneficial terms, and premium services with a perfect credit score, you most likely won’t see any huge benefit once you reach the “super-prime” scoring bracket.

So why strive for a perfect score? Remember that credit scores are dynamic, constantly going up and down, so today’s perfect score may be a little less next month. Furthermore, it certainly doesn’t hurt to aim for a perfect score and still have an excellent FICO even if you fall a little short. And since your credit score is a good indicator of your financial acumen and dealings with debt, a perfect credit score most likely means that your financial house is well in order.

Whether you want a perfect credit score – or just trying to improve your score until you reach 700 or even 800 – here are ten important strategies:

  1. Pay on time (and never miss a payment)

Even one late payment can hurt your score, and paying on time is about 35% of how FICO calculates your score. In fact, 96% of people with a FICO score of 785 or greater have no late payments on their credit reports.

  1. Pay down your balances

Your credit utilization ratio – how much debt you keep compared to total available balances – makes up about 30% of your credit score calculation. While you commonly hear that you should pay your credit cards and debt down below 30% of the available balances, to shoot for that perfect credit score, you’ll want to pay then down to 10% or below. In fact, a survey of consumers with 800+ scores revealed that their average credit utilization rate was just 7%.)

  1. Keep older and seasoned accounts

About 15% of your credit score is calculated by the length of your accounts, so older is better. According to FICO research, the average credit super scorer has an account that’s 19 years old. Likewise, the average age of their accounts is between 6 and 12 years, and they opened their most recent account 27 months ago or more.

  1. Keep a good mix of credit

10% of your credit score depends on managing a healthy mix of credit, including mortgages, installment loans, and high-quality revolving accounts. Consumers with FICO scores 760 and up have an average of six accounts that are currently “paid as agreed,” and an average of three accounts with a balance.

  1. Shop around in clusters

When you have your credit pulled to “shop around” for a loan, make sure it’s within a 30-day window and FICO won’t factor those pulls into your score. Even if they are spread out within 45 days, they’ll only be treated as one credit inquiry.

  1. Check your credit report often

About 25% of all credit reports contain errors, and ID theft and fraud affect about 1 in 8 American consumers. So to achieve a great score, check your score frequently and consider a credit monitoring service.

  1. Make payments before the due date

To earn an 800+ credit score, make payments well before you receive your bill and the due date. Try paying off (or down) your purchases at the end of every week for the best credit score.

  1. Increase your credit limit when offered

Another way to improve your credit utilization rate and boost your score is to take advantage of any offers to increase your credit line.

  1. Stick to one or two good credit cards

It’s best if you only use one or two cards on a regular basis. American Express is a great choice, as the balances don’t report to FICO since you pay them off in full every month.

  1. Improve your score with Nationwide Credit Clearing!

We’re the trusted leader in credit repair done right. Contact us at (773) 862-7700 or MyNationWideCredit.com for a free report and consultation so we can get you started on the way to a perfect credit score!

 


Tips to Improve Your Credit Score this Year!

It’s the beginning of a brand new year and we wonder,, have thought about your credit score yet?  A New Year means new opportunities for you financially!  For those of you seeking a more financially secured life, take these tips, read them, and begin to implement them into your daily routine.

  • Keep your credit card balances low. The most effective way to improve your credit score is to pay down your revolving (credit card) debt. Your credit utilization ratio accounts for 30 percent of your credit score. While you may hear that paying debt down to 30% of the available balance is a good mark, an ideal credit utilization ratio is actually around 10% or lower.
  • Pay your bills on time.
  • Don’t allow outdated or inaccurate information to remain on your credit report. If you see something incorrect listed on your report, you should take actions to have it removed.
  • Sending your payments in early may also help your credit score. Different creditors have different report dates when they send the information to the credit bureaus.
  • Check your credit report annually. It’s important to make sure that there are no errors on your credit file. A significant number of credit reports do have these errors, which can lower your score. These days, you also need to make sure that your identity hasn’t been stolen or compromised, which affects up to 1 in 8 Americans every year.
  • Don’t be tempted by new credit card offers or take on new debt. You can have these solicitations stopped being sent to you by “opting out” of these offers. 
  • Paying off a collection will NOT increase your score. It’s not the balance, but the fact that the account went into collection status is what is essentially hurting your score. But your score will increase if the collection agency is willing to delete the account off your credit report.
  • Don’t go without credit. You only have a credit score if you have an active credit history. Some credit scoring systems cannot calculate a score if no balance is reported to the credit history within the last six months.
  • If you want a high score, do not pay all your debt down to zero. FICO calculates a significant portion of your score by your credit utilization ratio, so it’s important to simply keep them all under 30% of their limit
  • Request an increase to your credit line. Then make sure not to use the excess credit because this will improve your overall credit % usage
  • Add missing accounts to your credit report. A perfect way to build your credit is to add positive accts that are not currently being reported. Unfortunately Cell phone companies, Internet providers, utility companies, and medical billers are not required to and often don’t bother reporting credit. But if you ask them to do so, they sometimes will post a new but well-seasoned, positive new trade line to your credit report.
  • If you’ve missed payments and have an account in collections, they will often agree to erase any negative credit reporting for that account as long as you pay it off in full.
  • Call Nationwide Credit Clearing if you have any questions in regards to your credit or want to see how you can improve it. We’re the nation’s leader in credit repair, with our clients enjoying a lifetime of financial freedom

Nationwide credit Clearing has been the leader in credit repair for over 20 years.  We can help anyone in the United States increase their credit score.  Give us a call today to find out how it all works!

Nationwide Credit Clearing

“Home of the Free Credit Report & Consultation”
2336 N. Damen
First Floor
Chicago, IL 60647

Phone: 773-862-7700
Toll Free: 877-334-3296
Fax: 773-862-7703
E-Mail: support@mynationwidecredit.com

follow us on…

Social icons by dreamstale (6) Social icons by dreamstale (10) Social icons by dreamstale (22) Social icons by dreamstale (5) Social icons by dreamstale (17)


6 Financial Mistakes Young People Make

Whether you just graduated from college or are moving out on your own, it can be hard to keep track of your personal finances as a young adult. Read through these 6 common financial mistakes and learn how you can avoid them.

 

credit-card-1080074_960_7201. Not Taking Advantage of Discounts: There is a world of special prices for students and young people out there, from banks to movie theatres – take advantage of them! Do your research beforehand, find out what discounts are available to you. Check out Groupon or Retail Me Not.

2. Misunderstanding Credit Cards: Whether it be cash advances, large balances, late fees, or only playing the minimum balance, credit cards can lead to much more trouble than realized. The fine print and details of credit cards are often times misunderstood by young people. Read into what you are signing up for and ask plenty for questions when you do not understand something.

3. Signing Up For A Rental Or Mortgage That Is Too Expensive: Signing a lease for rent or applying for a mortgage that leaves you with little money to do anything else, will not only leave you at home but put you at risk for debt. You have no cash at hand, so what do you do? Sign up for credit cards to make up the difference in order to enjoy your lifestyle and pay for unexpected costs. Avoid making this mistake, sign up for a lease or mortgage that is within your budget in order to avoid creating debt for yourself.

4. No Rainy Day Fund: Setting aside money for emergencies gives you cushion for unexpected events and helps you avoid adding to your credit card balance. Maybe your car got towed, or you get injured, having a “rainy day” fund keeps you prepared for the most unexpected events. Including a “rainy day” fund as a part of your budget, will eventually help the money add up.   

5. Failure To Realize How “Little Things” Add Up: Your daily coffee stops, eating lunch out, or weekly shopping trip of $100, can all add up to thousands of dollars a year. Cutting back can help you save a lot of money for savings, retirement or paying down your debt.

6. No Financial Planning Or Budget: Some young people are tainted by the idea that saving for the future is only for people thinking about retirement. Everyone can benefit from financial saving whether you are planning for retirement, purchasing a home, or traveling around the world. It is also important to budget your daily expenses. Sit down and look at what is left after your wages and fixed expenses. Not knowing how much you have can easily lead to spending more than you can afford. A budget will help you determine what you need to do to pay for your next vacation.

Nationwide Credit Clearing
2336 N. Damen
First Floor
Chicago, IL 60647

Phone: 773-862-7700
Toll Free: 877-334-3296
Fax: 773-862-7703
E-Mail: support@mynationwidecredit.com

https://mynationwidecredit.com

Your Credit Score


Five Free Credit Repair Tools

In addition to our programs at Nationwide Credit Clearing, there are several free ways to get help with your credit. If you are committed to repairing your credit score in 2016, you won’t want to miss these five free credit repair tools.

Untitled-3

  1. Credit Reports: Every person is entitled to a free annual copy of their credit report from the major bureaus. Thanks to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FRCA) which promotes the accuracy, fairness and privacy of information in the files of consumer reporting agencies. Take the time to review your report. Be sure to highlight any information that stands out or you believe may not be accurate. Identifying errors is the first step.
  2. Education: Today, in the digital era, we have access to more resources and information than ever before. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and Federal Trade Commission are government agencies that protect your credit rights and provide free education tools. It is important to take advantage of these tools and understand what affects your credit scores. Learn ways to adopt best practice to boost your credit score.
  3. Online Deals: Again, being an era surrounded by digital resources, why not take advantage of all the money-savings options. Check out sites like Groupon, RetailMeNot, and Living Social. If you are committed to improving your credit score, take the time to collect a savings.
  4. Digital Calculators: Before you make a big purchase, or take out a loan be sure you have your math done correctly. Estimate before you commit and use a free loan calculator. These numbers will help you to take the proper financial next steps.
  5. Budgeting: Make the most of your assets and income in 2016 and create a budget plan and stick with it. Proper financial management will guide you in the right direct toward a higher credit score.

 Don’t wait! Better Credit is just a click away!  Call the experts at Nationwide  Credit Clearing.  “Home of the Free Credit Report and Consultation”

Nationwide Credit Clearing
2336 N. Damen
First Floor
Chicago, IL 60647

Phone: 773-862-7700
Toll Free: 877-334-3296
Fax: 773-862-7703
E-Mail: support@mynationwidecredit.com

https://mynationwidecredit.com

Your Credit Score